The Enniscorthy Haunting: The Poltergeist of Court Street

Nestled within the quaint town of Enniscorthy, a seemingly ordinary house on Court Street was once the setting for a chilling and inexplicable series of events that continue to baffle the minds of both skeptics and believers in the supernatural. This is the tale of the Enniscorthy Poltergeist.

The house belonged to a hardworking couple, the Redmonds. To make ends meet, Mrs. Redmond opened the doors of their humble abode to boarders. The house, with its five modest rooms, resonated with the sounds of their daily lives until one chilling night in July 1910 when the air grew heavy with something else – the presence of the unknown.

John Randall, a carpenter and one of the boarders, would become the unwitting central character in this eerie tale. On the night of July 7, 1910, as Randall settled into his bed, he felt the bedclothes being pulled away. Thinking it to be a jest played by one of his fellow boarders, he laughed it off. But as the night grew darker, the laughs turned into gasps. A match struck to light the room revealed the bedclothes at the window, while the heavy bed had moved of its own accord.

But it didn’t stop there. The room was filled with the sound of hammering – a relentless tap-tap-tap that crescendoed into a thunderous cacophony. The bed started to shake and move across the room. The boarders, now gripped with terror, struck another match. There was no one else in the room. The footsteps of an invisible entity seemed to ascend the staircase, prowling outside their door but never entering.

The hauntings didn’t cease. Night after night, the room became a stage for ghostly antics. Chairs danced and floated in mid-air. The boarders were lifted out of their beds by unseen hands. One night, the bed tilted on its side, throwing its occupants to the floor.

Two brave souls, Mr. Murphy from the Guardian office and Mr. Devereux, decided to investigate. Armed with only their courage and a match, they positioned themselves strategically in the room. At 11:30 pm, the tapping began. It was Mr. Devereux who broke the silence, suggesting it sounded like a rat gnawing at wood. Then, as if responding to the comment, the bedclothes started to move.

What they witnessed next was a sight that defied logic and reason. The bedclothes didn’t just slide off, they seemed to be pulled underneath the bed. A search for wires or strings revealed nothing. The room was just an ordinary room, but something extraordinary was happening.

The Enniscorthy Poltergeist incident is an iconic in Irish folklore. The series of events that unfolded over those nights in July 1910 left an indelible mark on the souls who witnessed them. It stands as a reminder to the mysteries of the world we live in, a reminder that sometimes, the boundaries between the known and the unknown can become blurred and the echoes of the past can still be heard if you listen closely enough.

 

Sources: True Irish Ghost Stories compiled by St. John D. Seymour and Harry L. Neligan